IEORE4521 Systems Engineering Tools and Methods


Instructor: Ebad Jahangir

Additional Information: IEOR_E4521_Spring2015_Syllabus.pdf

Systems engineering as a technical discipline needs both qualitative and quantitative tools / methods to understand customer requirements, explore design options, design robust and optimized systems, and validate designs in the intended environments. This class is an introduction to the quantitative and semi-quantitative toolset that is primarily concerned with generating and managing information. These tools and methods can be broadly categorized by their use. The categories and some examples under these categories are provided below:

Requirements Management: MBSE, Systemic Textual Analysis, Viewpoint Analysis, QFD, Functional Modeling, Need Means Analysis, Function Means Analysis, Holistic Requirements Model, Stakeholder Map
Design: Heuristics, Taguchi Method, DSM, N2 Analysis, Matrix Diagram, VSM
Project Management: EVMS, Gantt Chart, PERT, SIPOC
Problem Solving: System Optimization, System Dynamics, Ishikawa Diagram, 5 Whys, QCPC, RRCA, Mistake Proofing; Functional Failure Mode and Effects Analysis
Collaboration: NGT, MFA, Affinity Diagrams, Context Diagram, Benchmarking
Decision Making: Risk Cubes, Cost-Risk-Benefit Analysis, Pugh Matrix

Applications of SE tools and methods in various settings will be discussed through examples, case studies, and homework assignments that will encompass the modern complex system development environments including aerospace and defense, transportation, energy, communications, and modern software-intensive systems.

After taking the class, the students will become familiar with the key SE methodologies in various settings and will have at their disposal a suite of tools that can be drawn upon during various phases of product or process development. The importance of a toolset that emphasizes a holistic and integrative view of systems and the environment will be emphasized.

The course was formerly IEOR E4571.



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